We finished the week with an interview with the “Directora Municipal de la Oficina de la Mujer” * of Tecpán. Her office is located in the heart of the city, in the large building of the town hall which borders the central square where the market takes place every week. We were greeted by three women – “latinas” and “indigenas” they later told us – and made us wait a few moments.

Without waiting too long, the director, in her forties, greeted us warmly in a cramped office, with walls are lined with administrative documents, drawings and photos. We struggled to find a place in this confined space: the technical preparation of the interview is like a game of Tetris …

We were finally ready to begin this interview, turned towards a more political and institutional vision of the issues of Maya women’s rights in Guatemala.

Without saying much about our future documentary, we still want to share with you some key elements of this meeting (because yes, we also want to make you live a suspense worthy of that of the most awaited series). Oficina de la Mujer aims to provide better opportunities for women “indigenas” or “latinas”. The director explains that, according to her, men and women are equally equal in law, but that everyone must respect specific obligations. If women are to take care of their children and their husbands, they are in charge of providing sufficient economic resources for the well-being of their families. That’s why workshops are organized to make women make soap, laundry or other objects…

It is true that we are far enough away from the vision and work done by Wuqu’Kawoq, in terms of “empoderamiento” of Guatemalan women. However, both institutions work in both Spanish and Kaqchikel, in order to respect what is now recognized by international law as a collective right of indigenous peoples – “respect for indigenous languages ​​and cultures” (Declaration of Nations United Nations on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, 2007). More broadly, while Guatemala’s social and economic hierarchy is largely determined by ethnic and cultural characteristics, language is a real hobby in this country. Such an observation is not without echoing similar situations in other regions of the world …

We look forward to revealing more about what we learn every day through our meetings and interviews.

* director of the municipal office dedicated to women