A new week began today, and we had to find Yoli, the “Program Manager of Salud Móvil” at the Wuqu’Kawoq office to do an interview. For the occasion, Yoli had put on her best traditional outfit. She began by explaining to us that she has been working in the organization for seven months. Then she described the ins and outs of the program she has to supervise. In Maya communities, a “comadrona” takes care of pregnant women throughout their pregnancy. In the area around Tecpán, there are nearly 150 comadronas and Wuqu’Kawoq collaborates with 42 of them, offering them a phone with an application to monitor the health of patients and future children. The comadronas also use the app if they discover certain complications that require the aide of Wuqu’Kawoq’s doctors. In case of emergency, the comadronas call Wuqu’Kawoq and the patients are taken directly to the Chimaltenango hospital with an attendant who translates Kaqchikel once there. In fact, most public health workers do not speak Kaqchikel and it is very common for women in indigenous communities to be discriminated against and perceived as “ignorant.” The companions of the salud móbil program are therefore also psychological supports for these women who are generally afraid of the hospital, and have never  traveled to the city. For Yoli, the most important thing is to give the necessary attention to the patients, which they often do not receive from the hospital staff.

The afternoon was just as studious. Laura and Elea stayed on the roof of the house, armed with their cameras while Chorkin and Penelope worked in the warm apartment. But our host, Esperanza, Queen of Tecpán, who is not immune to anything, was able to grasp the abnormality of the situation and came in the evening – under cover of a tea and a hot dish – to find out more on our strange activities of the day …

  • Interview with Yoli